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When a 10-year old Sussex spaniel won 'best in show' at Woodminster, the world applauded. After all, if 60 is the new 40 for humans, then 10 is the new 7 for dogs. Author Ted Kerasote contends that we can prolong the lives of our dogs and keep them both sharp and agile by working them physically and mentally, just as we do ourselves. His forthcoming book, "Why Dogs Die Young and What We Can Do About It" charges inbreeding, environmental pollutants, commercial dog foods, and vaccinations as factors which cut short our dogs lives by giving them, among other diseases, cancers.

We really appreciate your feedback and value your opinion. Could you please let others know what you think of the Good Dog podcast by writing a review in iTunes? Plus I'd love to recieve your questions or suggestions, please click on Email Joanne at GoodDogPodcast.com

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Chuck Tanner on Why Sports Prevent Revolutions
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Charles William Tanner (born July 4, 1929 in New Castle, Pennsylvania) is a former left fielder and manager. After spending five seasons as a special assistant to the general manager of the Cleveland Indians, Tanner was named a senior advisor to new Pittsburgh Pirates GM Neal Huntington in the autumn of 2007.

A left-handed batter and thrower, Tanner signed his first contract with the Boston Braves. He played for eight seasons (1955 – 1962) for four different teams: the Chicago Cubs and Los Angeles Angels, as well as the Braves (then based in Milwaukee) and the Indians. In 396 games played, Tanner batted .261 with 21 home runs.

In 1963 he began managing in the Angels' minor league system, where in 1970 he led the AAA Hawaii Islanders to 98 wins in 146 games and the Pacific Coast League pennant. He then received his first major league managing assignment in 1970 with the Chicago White Sox.

With the White Sox, Tanner managed such star players as Wilbur Wood, Carlos May, Bill Melton, and the temperamental Dick Allen. His most successful season with the Sox came in 1972, when he managed them to a close second-place finish in the American League Western Division behind the eventual World Series champion Oakland Athletics. Tanner managed the Sox until 1975, when he was fired and replaced by Paul Richards.

In 1976, Charles Finley hired Tanner to manage the Oakland Athletics. With speedy players such as Bert Campaneris, Bill North, and Don Baylor, Tanner made the A's into a running team, stealing a major league-record 341 bases. The A's, however, lost out in the division race to the Kansas City Royals.

Before the 1977 season, the A's were in the process of trading off many of their stars of the great team that won three straight championships from 1972-74. Part of the sell-off was the trading of Tanner's services to the Pittsburgh Pirates for an aging Manny Sanguillen. This was the second instance in major-league history where a manager has been part of a baseball trade (Joe Gordon and Jimmie Dykes were traded for each other in the 1960s; Lou Piniella of the Seattle Mariners was traded to the Tampa Bay Devil Rays almost 30 years later).

He reached the pinnacle of his managerial career in 1979 as the skipper of the World Champion Pittsburgh Pirates. Tanner was well known for his unrelenting optimism, which permeated his teams. The Pirates were able to win in 1979 after falling behind, three games to one in the World Series. Tanner left Pittsburgh after the 1985 season and finished his managerial career with the Atlanta Braves.

He is the father of former major league player and coach Bruce Tanner. In 2006, he was invited to be a coach in the 2006 All Star game by NL manager Phil Garner, who played for the Pirates during Tanner's tenure as Manager. Prior to the start of the game, Tanner threw out the ceremonial first pitch.

Tanner rejoined the Pirates organization in 2007 as a special advisor to general manager Neal Huntington. Tanner had previously been an advisor in the Milwaukee Brewers and Cleveland Indians organizations. He continues to live in his home town of New Castle.

This data was drawn from Wikipedia.

This episode was originally broadcast as a national radio syndication in August 1987.

Smarter Podcasts.com, Delivering Sound Advice.

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Mickey Hatcher on Getting Called Up to the Majors
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Michael "Mickey" Hatcher was, most notably, Kirk Gibson's replacement for the Los Angeles Dodgers in the 1988 World Series, batting .368 (7/19) with two home runs and five RBI. He is from Mesa, Arizona.

He is admired for his fun-loving approach to playing baseball, particularly on the World Champion 1988 Dodger team, and was featured in various presentations to the tune of the "Mickey Mouse Club" song. He would sprint to first base after drawing walks, like Pete Rose, and garnered a lot of media attention in the 1988 World Series by hitting a first-inning home run in Game 1 and sprinting full-speed around the bases instead of jogging. This prompted NBC broadcaster Vin Scully to say "He's a Saturday Evening Post character!" and "He's running like he's afraid they're going to take it off the board!" Hatcher had only hit one home run in that 1988 season, but hit two in the World Series.

He is currently the hitting coach for the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim, with whom he won his second World Series title, in 2002. The Angels are managed by Mike Scioscia, Hatcher's teammate from the 1988 World Championship team.

This data was drawn from Wikipedia.

This episode was originally broadcast as a national radio syndication in April 1987.

Smarter Podcasts.com, Delivering Sound Advice.

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Daryl Strawberry & Mookie Wilson on the 1986 Pennant Mets v Houston
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Darryl Eugene Strawberry (born March 12, 1962) is well-known both for his play on the baseball field and for his controversial behavior off of it.

Throughout the 1980s and early 1990s, Strawberry was one of the most feared sluggers in the game, known for his prodigious home runs and his intimidating presence in the batter's box with his 6-foot-6 frame and his long, looping swing. During his 17-year career, he helped lead the New York Mets to one World Series championship in 1986 and the New York Yankees to three World Series championships in 1996, 1998, 1999.

A popular player during his career, Strawberry was voted to the All-Star Game eight straight times from 1984-1991.

In 1985, despite missing 40 games due to an injury to his right thumb, he hit 29 home runs but the Mets fell 5 games behind the St. Louis Cardinals in the NL East.

In 1986, Strawberry hit 27 homers and had 99 RBIs as the Mets won the 1986 World Series.

Strawberry signed as a free agent with the Los Angeles Dodgers in 1991, inking a lucrative five-year $22.25 million contract. In California, he was named Big Brother of The Year for that year. After hitting 28 home runs and bringing in 99 runs batted in a successful first year for the Dodgers, injuries and personal problems kept him sidelined for much of the next two seasons, hitting five home runs in each season.

William Hayward "Mookie" Wilson (born February 9, 1956) played with the New York Mets (1980–89) and Toronto Blue Jays (1989–91). He was a switch hitter, known for his impressive speed and positive attitude. Fans would frequently chant "Mooooo-kie" in appreciation of him.

Born in Bamberg, South Carolina, Wilson played college baseball at Spartanburg Methodist College and then the University of South Carolina. Later, in 1996, he earned a bachelor's degree from Mercy College in New York.

In twelve seasons, Wilson was a .274 hitter with 67 home runs, 438 RBI, and 327 stolen bases in 1403 games. Wilson held the Mets record for career stolen bases (281) and career triples (62) until Jose Reyes broke both marks during the 2008 season.

Wilson is the batter who, in Game 6 of the 1986 World Series, avoided being hit by a wild pitch, allowing the tying run to score in the bottom of the 10th. His ground ball later in the same at bat went through the legs of Red Sox first baseman Bill Buckner, allowing the winning run to score. The ball that rolled through Buckner's legs is now housed in the Seth Swirsky baseball collection.

When the Mets decided to rebuild, Wilson requested a trade. The Mets accommodated him by trading him to the Blue Jays in exchange for Jeff Musselman and Mike Brady on August 1, 1989.

Wilson was inducted into the New York Mets Hall of Fame in 1996. In 2005, Wilson managed the single A team Brooklyn Cyclones. Previously, he managed the Rookie League Kingsport Mets team and was a coach for the New York Mets from 1997 to 2002.

In 1999, Wilson obtained a license to drive tractor-trailer trucks and began hauling freight in the offseason, a job he stated his intention to keep if and when he left professional baseball.

This data was drawn from Wikipedia.

This episode was originally broadcast as a national radio syndication in October 1987.

Smarter Podcasts.com, Delivering Sound Advice.

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Mike Krukow on his Embarrassing MLB Debut at Wrigley Field
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Pitcher Mike Krukow had a solid, if unspectacular career in the major leagues. He was drafted by the Chicago Cubs in the 8th round of the 1973 draft and Krukow played Major League baseball for the Chicago Cubs (1976–1981), the Philadelphia Phillies (1982) and the San Francisco Giants (1983–1989).

Krukow's best season was in 1986, posting a record of 20-9 with a 3.05 ERA pitching for the San Francisco Giants. Giants fans can not argue Krukow should have won the Cy Young Award in 1986 as he finished third behind Mike Scott and Fernando Valenzuela, each of whom had better statistics on the season. Krukow was selected to the National League All-Star team that season. He was awarded the Willie Mac Award in both 1985 and 1986 honoring his spirit and leadership. In 1987, Krukow helped lead the Giants to their first division championship in 16 years. His final game was June 4, 1989.

Krukow is currently a broadcaster for the San Francisco Giants. He is a five-time Emmy award winner. "Kruk," who was named as the starting right-handed pitcher to the 1980s Giants All- Decade Team in a vote by Bay Area media in 1999, is noted for his deep knowledge of the game and tremendous sense of humor

This data was drawn from Wikipedia.

This episode originally was broadcast in April 1987.

Smarter Podcasts.com, Delivering Sound Advice.

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Duke Snider Admired Jackie Robinson Growing Up in L.A.
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Hall of Fame outfielder Duke Snider played in his first Major League game in 1947 for the Brooklyn Dodgers. It was also the first big league game he ever saw. That day was also important in American History, and he tells why.

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George Brett on His Favorite All-Star Game
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George Howard Brett (born May 15, 1953 in Glen Dale, West Virginia), a third baseman, was the youngest of four sons of a sports-minded family which included his oldest brother Ken, a major-league pitcher who had pitched in the World Series in 1967 at 19 years old. Brothers John and Bobby had brief careers in the minor leagues. Although George was born in the Northern Panhandle of West Virginia, the Brett family moved to the Midwest and later to El Segundo, a suburb of Los Angeles, just south of Los Angeles International Airport. George grew up hoping to follow in the footsteps of his three older brothers. He graduated from El Segundo High School in 1971 and was drafted by the Kansas City Royals in the second round (29th overall) of the 1971 baseball draft. His high school teammate was pitcher Scott McGregor.

His 3,154 career hits are the most by any third baseman in major league history, and 15th all-time. Baseball historian Bill James regards him as the second-best third baseman of all time, trailing only his contemporary, Mike Schmidt. Brett was elected to the Hall of Fame in 1999, with what was then the fourth-highest voting percentage in baseball history (98.2%), trailing only Tom Seaver, Nolan Ryan, and Ty Cobb. In 2007, Cal Ripken Jr. passed Brett with 98.5% of the vote. His voting percentage was higher than all-time outfielders Babe Ruth, Hank Aaron, Willie Mays, Stan Musial, Ted Williams, and Joe DiMaggio. That same year, he ranked Number 55 on The Sporting News' list of the 100 Greatest Baseball Players, and was nominated as a finalist for the Major League Baseball All-Century Team. Brett is one of four players in MLB history to accumulate 3,000 hits, 300 home runs, and a career .300 batting average (the others are Stan Musial, Willie Mays, and Hank Aaron). Most indicative of his hitting style, Brett is sixth on the career doubles list, with 665 (trailing Tris Speaker, Pete Rose, Stan Musial, Ty Cobb, and Craig Biggio). Combining his superior hitting skill with his great defensive ability and team focus (and humility), George Brett is arguably one of the most complete baseball players of all time.

Following the end of his baseball career, Brett became a vice president of the Royals and has worked as a part-time coach, as a special instructor in spring training, filling in as the batting coach, and as a minor league instructor dispatched to help prospects develop. In 1998, an investor group headed by Brett and his older brother, Bobby, made an unsuccessful bid to purchase the Kansas City Royals. He also runs a baseball equipment company, Brett Bros., with Bobby and, until his death, Ken Brett. He has also lent his name to a restaurant on the Country Club Plaza.

In 1992, Brett married the former Leslie Davenport and they currently reside in the Kansas City suburb of Mission Hills, KS. The couple has three children: Jackson (named after the ballplayer's father), Dylan, and Robin (named for fellow Hall of Famer Robin Yount of the Milwaukee Brewers).

This data was drawn from Wikipedia.

This episode was originally broadcast as a national radio syndication in July 1987.

Smarter Podcasts.com, Delivering Sound Advice.

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Nolan Ryan fondly remembers Little League Baseball
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Lynn Nolan Ryan, Jr. (born January 31, 1947) is a former American right-handed pitcher who played in a major league record 27 seasons for the New York Mets, California Angels, Houston Astros, and Texas Rangers, from 1966 to 1993.

Ryan, a hard-throwing right-handed pitcher, threw pitches that were regularly recorded above 100 mph, even past the age of 40. The media tagged him, or more specifically his pitching, as "The Ryan Express" (a reference to the 1965 film Von Ryan's Express).

Ryan was an eight-time MLB All-Star, and his 5,714 career strikeouts rank first in baseball history. He leads the runner-up by over 1,000 strikeouts as of early in the 2007 season. The pitcher in second place as of early 2007 varies between Roger Clemens and Randy Johnson, who are both active and who are both over the 4,600-strikeout mark. Similarly, Ryan's 2,795 bases on balls lead second-place Steve Carlton by 962—walking over 50% more hitters than any other pitcher in Major League history.

Ryan is also the all-time leader in no-hitters with seven, three more than any other pitcher. He is tied with Bob Feller for the most one-hitters with 12. Ryan also pitched 18 two-hitters.

This episode originally aired September 11, 1987.

Smarter Podcasts.com, Delivering Sound Advice.

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Roger Clemens Recalls His First Game with the Red Sox
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Roger Clemens big league debut with the Boston Red Sox was May 15, 1984. In this interview conducted during Spring Training of 1987, he recalls a cold night against Cleveland.

This episode originally aired May 12, 1987.

SmarterPodcasts.com, Delivering Sound Advice

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Ernie Banks on his Memories and Life After Baseball
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Ernie Banks has many memories of playing for the Cubs and he shares some with us.

This episode originally aired May 12, 1987.

SmarterPodcasts.com, Delivering Sound Advice

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Warren Spahn on The Magic of Opening Day
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"A ballpark is an empty place until you put people in it." Warren Spahn loved the sounds and anticipation of Opening Day and shares his memories of his 21 seasons.

This episode originally aired the first week of the 1987 baseball season.

SmarterPodcasts.com, Delivering Sound Advice

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Whitey Ford on Game 1 - 1955WS NYY v Brooklyn Dodgers: Jackie Robinson Steals Home
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Whitey Ford pitched for the New York Yankees in Game 1 of the 1955 World Series. One of the most famous pieces of historic footage of that game was when the Dodgers' Jackie Robinson stole home, Whitey remembers that moment.

SmarterPodcasts.com, Delivering Sound Advice

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Pee Wee Reese on My teammate, Jackie Robinson
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Hall of Fame Shortstop Pee Wee Reese was from Louisville, Kentucky and never knew a black person until Jackie Robinson joined the Brooklyn Dodgers on April 15, 1947. Pee Wee remembers that day and his teammate fondly.

SmarterPodcasts.com, Delivering Sound Advice

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Hank Aaron on Breaking Babe Ruth's Record
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Home Run King Hank Aaron talks about his vivid and not so vivid memories of the day in 1974 that he hit Home Run #715, breaking Babe Ruth's home run record.

SmarterPodcasts.com, Delivering Sound Advice

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Duke Snider on Opening Day 1947
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Hall of Fame outfielder Duke Snider played in his first Major League game in 1947 for the Brooklyn Dodgers. It was also the first big league game he ever saw. That day was also important in American History, and he tells why.

“A safe, decent, affordable home is like a vaccine — it literally keeps children healthy,” says Dr. Megan Sandel, Co-Principal Investigator at Children’s Health Watch; Associate Professor of Pediatrics & Public Health at Boston University Schools for Medicine and Public Health; and Medical Director of the National Center for Medical-Legal Partnership. In this month’s episode of the Affordable Housing Podcast, Dr. Sandel joins host Joanne Greene in a lively and informative discussion on the impacts of what Dr. Sandel calls “housing insecurity”– overcrowded conditions, frequent moves, unsafe or unsanitary conditions, and inability to keep up with rents–on the health of children, particularly those between the ages of zero and three.

RESOURCES

* Listen to this and prior episodes of the Affordable Housing Podcast at EdenHousing.org
* For additional information on this topic, visit:
* ChildrensHealthwatch.org
* Medical-LegalPartnership.org
* Free subscriptions to the monthly Affordable Housing Podcast are available in iTunes

Jennifer Peck, founding member and Executive Director of the Oakland, CA based Partnership for Children & Youth joins Affordable Housing Podcast host Joanne Greene to discuss this organization’s services and accomplishments that started in 1997. Their primary goal is to connect schools and their community partners in underserved Bay Area communities with available public and private resources. They’re also committed to improving the effectiveness of funding streams and services for low-income children so that all children have the learning, health and social support they need to succeed in school and in life.

RESOURCES
* Listen to this and prior episodes of the Affordable Housing Podcast on Eden Housing’s website.
* For more information on Partnership for Children & Youth, please visit PartnerForChildren.org.
* For resources on back to school services you may also visit SummerMatters2You.net
* Free subscriptions to the monthly Affordable Housing Podcast are available on iTunes

Larry Minnix, President and CEO of Leading Age, a Washington, D.C. based association dedicated to making America a better place to grow old. LeadingAge focuses on advocacy, education and applied research, promoting adult day services, home health, hospice, community-based services, and Programs of All-inclusive Care for the Elderly, known as PAC. Host Joanne Greene invites Larry to discuss their work on senior housing, assisted living, continuing care communities, & nursing homes as well as technology solutions and practices that support the health and well-being of seniors, children and those with special needs.
LeadingAge members comprise 6,000 not-for-profit organizations, 39 state partners, hundreds of businesses, research partners, consumer organizations, foundations and a broad global network of aging services organizations that reach more than 30 countries.
Eden Housing has promoted senior housing and aging in place throughout its history.

RESOURCES
* Listen to this and prior episodes of the Affordable Housing Podcast on Eden Housing’s website.
* For more information on Leading Age, please visit LeadingAge.org.
* Free subscriptions to the monthly Affordable Housing Podcast are available on iTunes

Dianne Spaulding, Executive Director of the Non-Profit Housing Association of Northern California (NPH) returns to discuss the challenges and opportunities of inclusionary housing in California. Creatively implemented by cities and counties throughout the Country, inclusionary housing policies are an innovative solution to fund the development of greatly needed affordable housing for lower-income residents. These policies, tailored by local jurisdictions to meet their unique community needs, require developers to offer lower-priced units in otherwise market-rate developments, or encourage their inclusion through incentives.

NPH has gained a national reputation for many of its capacity building initiatives including the areas of technical assistance and training, inclusionary zoning, housing element campaigns, community acceptance strategies planning and other groundbreaking approaches to boosting the supply of affordable housing production.

RESOURCES
* Listen to this and prior episodes of the Affordable Housing Podcast on Eden Housing’s website.
* For more information on Inclusionary Housing, please visit www.nhc.org.
* Free subscriptions to the monthly Affordable Housing Podcast are available on iTunes

When California’s redevelopment agencies were eliminated, affordable housing took a crushing blow. Advocates throughout the State are mobilizing to create a new dedicated funding source for affordable housing through the California Homes and Jobs Act. On this episode of the Affordable Housing podcast, brought to you by Eden Housing, host Joanne Greene speaks to our guest California Senator Mark DeSaulnier, Chairman of the Housing and Transportation Subcommittee and sponsor of SB 391, the California Homes and Jobs Act. SB 391 is scheduled to be heard in the Senate Transportation and Housing Committee on April 9, 2013.

As chair of Transportation and Housing, Senator DeSaulnier has fought for greater accountability on the state’s transportation infrastructure projects. Through other committee assignments Senator DeSaulnier has been a strong advocate for California’s more vulnerable populations, introducing legislation to support underserved, homeless and foster youth.

In late 2011 – early 2012, the California Supreme Court rendered a set of decisions that resulted in the elimination of redevelopment agencies. That effectively eliminated a billion dollars a year that local governments were using to help create and preserve affordable housing. Senator DeSaulnier was a leader in efforts to save housing funding.

RESOURCES
* Listen to this and prior episodes of the Affordable Housing Podcast on Eden Housing’s website.
* For more information on SB 391, please visit www.cahomesandjobsact.org.
* Free subscriptions to the monthly Affordable Housing Podcast are available on iTunes.

What topics and special guests would you like to see featured on the Affordable Housing Podcast? We want to hear from you! Send your ideas to Eden Housing’s Communications Department<mailto:[email protected]>.

Thank you for your continued support and partnership!